Babie Nayms – Part 1

Names that someone already bears, A-Z

Even though the list begins with ‘A’ I hardly know where to begin to “wrap my mind around it.”  Each name is followed by a year, which for many is the year I know someone was given the name, or is the best I can estimate the year of birth.  Am I suggesting that these are all terrible names?  No!  Many have been around for quite a few years, are lovely names for a child or adult, and deserve to be perpetuated.  Therefore a few classic examples are included.  Many, though, leave a lot to be desired, especially an explanation.  So, here we go:

– A –

  • Abrielle, 2006
  • Acadia, 1984
  • Addie, 1980
  • Addyson, 2008
  • Adelina, 1969
  • Aderyn, 2005
  • Adria, 1982
  • Adyn, 2006
  • Alane, 1948
  • Aldea, 1919
  • Aleeza, 1989
  • Alelia, 2000
  • Alene, 1926
  • Aleyne, 1971
  • Alexus, 1999
  • Aliah, 2008
  • Alicen, 2007
  • Alina, 2009
  • Alkira, 2009
  • Almida, 1923
  • Almire, 1947
  • Almon, 1942
  • Almond, 1937
  • Aloma, 1944
  • Alona, 1947
  • Aloura, 2004
  • Alric, 1913
  • Altara, 2002
  • Alycin, 2002
  • Alyvia, 1998
  • Amapola, 1961
  • Ameliese, 2000
  • Anaraivyn, 1998
  • Anethia, 1962
  • Annaliese, 1993
  • Ardean, 1933
  • Ardella, 1931
  • Arden, 1935
  • Aren, 2000
  • Argos, 2004
  • Arica, 1980
  • Aryn, 1999
  • Asher, 1991
  • Ashli, 1990
  • Atrus, 2006
  • Atwood, 1917
  • Aubine, 1930
  • Aubrey, 1976
  • Aubrie, 2010
  • Augusta, 1906
  • Avard, 1957
  • Avena, 1940
  • Averie, 2008
  • Avilda, 1930
  • Avner, 1988
  • Axie, 1921
  • Ayden, 2004
  • Ayn, 1905
  • Ayva, 2009
  • Aziza, 2006
  • Azure, 1980

Now, examine a couple of these, if you will.  Alyvia: Was mom looking for a different way to spell Olivia?  Sounds almost the same, but is no longer a tribute to the mighty olive.  Ameliese: A twist on Analiese?  Atrus: son of Gehn and grandson of Ti’ana is the main character in the Myst computer game series.  (For a whole bunch of additional contrived names, just Google “Myst”.)

– B –

  • Baileigh, 1999
  • Baline, 1994
  • Bayleigh, 1999
  • Bettina, 1945
  • Bion, 1961
  • Birchum, 1923
  • Blane, 1961
  • Blayke, 2003
  • Bode, 1977
  • Braigan, 1997
  • Breckin, 2004
  • Breighane, 1986
  • Brenna, 1988
  • Breonah, 2008
  • Breylee, 2007
  • Bronie, 1945
  • Bryttani, 1990
  • Bryttnie, 2001

Baileigh and Bayleigh: touching variants of Bailey and the suffix -leigh, (a rightful name unto itself, from the English “meadowv).  Bailey, as a name unto itself, stands corrected — or corrupted.  Baline: meant to put one in mind of a cetacean?  Bion: a little too old to have derived from bionic; maybe there’s a family history.  Birchum: Great name!  It recalls a woman I once knew named Birchard, which was also the middle name of our nineteenth President.  Breonah: Were we trying for Briana, the feminine form of Brian?  Bryttani/Bryttnie: Lord have myrci…  Some time back it became de rigueur to drop heavy-sounding names on girls, such as Madison and Courtney.  Did it seem bolder, then, to suggest a dog, that is, the Brittany spaniel?  A pretty name, though, and who could argue with an audacious name on a pretty girl, especially one who could smartly point out that Brittany is not a dog but a region in France?  (A region recognizing Great Britain.)  So, what happened to the name in the 1990s?  Is it anything else but an attempt to be cutesy with the original spelling?  (A revolt against the original spelling?  Britney Spears wasn’t heard of in 1992, was she?)  I confess to assuming that two spellings with the same pronunciation are the same name, Stephen and Steven, OK?  Marc and Mark.  Candi and Candy.  Maybe Bryttni is not a reference to Brittany at all!  Maybe it’s a made-up nonsense word.  Or maybe I’m missing the simple explanation: Maybe Bryttni is to Brittany as Libby or Beth are to Elizabeth, as Meg or Peg substitutes for Margaret, Sandy for Sandra, Dick for Richard, Tom for Thomas, Bill or Willy for William, Gerry for Gerald, Bob for Robert.  As with Willy and Sandy and Gerry, what is sometimes the nickname to one is someone else’s given name; I’ve met plenty of people named Betty or Cindy whose original name is not Elizabeth or Cynthia.  Maybe that’s what Bryttni’s mom had in mind, (and assumed everyone would understand).

– C –

  • Cade, 1997
  • Caden, 2001
  • Cadence, 2007
  • Cadie, 1996
  • Cadin, 2002
  • Cadye, 1997
  • Callier, 1936
  • Cami, 1981
  • Camryn, 1998
  • Carmalene, 1949
  • Caroly, 1945
  • Cash, 1961
  • Cassi, 2000
  • Caylub, 2008
  • Chalize, 1990
  • Chalon, 1992
  • Charbeth, 1974
  • Charlize, 1975
  • Chauntelle, 2002
  • Chaz, 1992
  • Chelci, 1990
  • Cherelle, 1984
  • Cheryldene, 1932
  • Chessintra, 2001
  • Chevala, 1974
  • Cheyanne, 1997
  • Chimere, 1950
  • Clotell, 1990
  • Clydean, 1952
  • Codi, 1984
  • Codie, 1995
  • Cole, 1891
  • Colt, 1990
  • Connar, 2008
  • Coreyna, 2003
  • Corinth, 1995
  • Cormac, 2006
  • Coty, 1993
  • Creagan, 1991
  • Cressa, 1933
  • Cydney, 1993
  • Cynara, 1971

Cadye: Is this a play on Katie?  Camryn: Nothing says that there is only one spelling for Cameron, derived perhaps from a Scottish word describing a crooked nose earned in battle.  But if we spell it Camryn (see also the abuses under ‘K’) we can make something cutesy from something dignified.  Chelci: Is there a tradition I’m not aware of that we are invoking to corrupt these names?  There is a place called Chelsea.  We seem to like the sound of it, but we butcher the spelling.  I just don’t get it.  Codi: There are many variants of this.  It seemed to peak in the early 1980s about the same time as the more common Cory and its many spellings.  Colt: I’ve already asked whether he becomes Stallion when he grows up.

– D –

  • Daegan, 2000
  • Dakoda, 2006
  • Dakotah, 1993
  • Dallis, 1930
  • Danarae, 1963
  • Dante, 2004
  • Darcel, 1967
  • Darel, 1988
  • Darian, 1999
  • Darice, 1947
  • Darrick, 1977
  • Daryn, 2004
  • Daveena, 1982
  • Dayna, 1987
  • Dayne, 1960
  • Daynel, 1949
  • Dayson, 2002
  • Dax, 2007
  • Deaja, 2000
  • Deegan, 2003
  • Deiken, 2009
  • Deja, 1996
  • Delcie, 1968
  • Delicia, 1920
  • Delight, 1931
  • Delphin, 1925
  • Deltha, 1946
  • Demiken, 2001
  • Deni, 1963
  • Denielle, 1989
  • Deron, 2003
  • Desarae, 1985
  • Desaray, 1993
  • Deshon, 1973
  • Desman, 2000
  • Destina, 2003
  • Destyni, 1987
  • Devan, 1988
  • Devra, 1946
  • Devvan, 1991
  • Dezaray, 1995
  • Deziree, 1985
  • Diem, 1984
  • Dietra, 1960
  • Dillanne, 2003
  • Diondre, 2000
  • Dola, 1939
  • Dominyk, 1999
  • Donaldeen, 1928
  • Donat, 1930
  • Donni, 1986
  • Dontay, 1996
  • Dorice, 1947
  • Dorleene, 1946
  • Dorrice, 1945
  • Dreama, 1973
  • Drouin, 2008
  • Dulcey, 1968
  • Dushane, 1992
  • Duska, 1969
  • Dwaine, 1976
  • Dwinal, 1937
  • Dyana, 1983
  • Dyllon, 1998

Dakoda/Dakotah: The Dakota were a band of Sioux, and maybe when the language was first rendered in English these alternate spellings were used and the young moms who conferred these spellings on their babies are much better informed about 19th-century US history than I am; but then again, maybe not.  (Cutesy wins again.)  Dallis: actually a valid spelling of the Gaelic that is commonly seen as Dallas, implying from the dales (valleys).  Dante: Why don’t we see this name more often?  Dante Alleghieri had a profound and positive influence on literature and the Italian language, a worthy name to bestow on a modern child.  Delicia and Delight: Wow!  These names must have created a stir in the 1920s and 1930s.  Donat: Actually, I know this to be a French-Canadian name, but I admire the man I know whose name is Donat so I couldn’t resist including it.  Destyni: Ah, swete mystyre of lief!  What dose it mattre wheer the leettrs flla?  As with Bryttani, the letters are all there, and let the reader unscramble them!  Devvan: A real double vé, may the French rejoice!  It almost looks like a ‘W’.

– E –

  • Easter, 1918
  • Echo, 1988
  • Eliesha, 1986
  • Elisheva, 2007
  • Ellora, 2010
  • Eloi, 1944
  • Elxis, 1995
  • Emden, 1936
  • Emmi, 1935
  • Emmieleen, 1950
  • Eola, 1959
  • Ervilita, 1982
  • Esmae, 2005
  • Estenna, 1922
  • Euretta, 1925
  • Evaughn, 1978
  • Evette, 2003

Easter: Named for the holiday of the Paschal season in Christianity, which has nothing to do with the compass direction, east.  But you could go that way anyway, especially if you have quadruplets.  Name one for each compass point.  Evette: equals Yvette?

– F –

  • Falisha, 2010
  • Farrah, 1947
  • Fatia, 1989
  • Fatune, 1986
  • Finbar, 1957
  • Fonda, 1955
  • Forest, 1932

Falisha: equals Felicia?  Forest: I first saw it as Forrest.  But that doesn’t mean it has to be misspelled.  (Add a third ‘r’ and make it Forrrest.  Then you could trill the ‘r’.)  If you did, imagine your kid going through life correcting everyone who doesn’t give it the trippple ‘r’.)

– G –

  • Garnet, 1951
  • Gayleen, 1963
  • Gaynell, 1927
  • Gean, 1926
  • Genesis, 2007
  • Goldie, 1882
  • Graelyn, 1959
  • Graylin, 1956
  • Greylen, 1973
  • Greyson, 1996
  • Grita, 1932

Galen is a name that many middle-aged men bear.  It has gone out of favor because it sounds like gay.  Frankly, Gay (sometimes Gaye) was a great name back when gay meant light-hearted and carefree.  Graelyn: I know quite a few men whose names are built on the color gray-grey.

– H –

  • Halton, 1917
  • Hampy, 1925
  • Harli, 1993
  • Heaven, 1977
  • Hermel, 1950
  • Hill, 1892
  • Hilma, 1920
  • Hisa, 1927

Names beginning with ‘H’ are scarce.

– I –

  • Ila, 1925
  • Ilidia, 1967
  • Ilsa, 2001
  • Innora, 2008
  • Inza, 1934
  • Ione, 1927
  • Irven, 1944
  • Issa, 1977
  • Iva, 1921
  • Ivolene, 1925
  • Izaiah, 1999
  • Izak, 2004
  • Izayah, 2006
  • Izeldia, 1936
  • Iziah, 1999

Yes, Iziah.

– J –

  • Jacalyn, 1952
  • Jace, 2002
  • Jaicee, 2005
  • Jaicie, 2000
  • Jaide, 2001
  • Jaiden, 2008
  • Jaidyn, 2004
  • Jailyn, 2008
  • Jaime, 1983
  • Jaksin, 2006
  • Jalen, 2000
  • Jamerson, 1969
  • Jammey, 1947
  • Jarrica, 1992
  • Jarryd, 1996
  • Jayde Danyelle, 1987
  • Jaymis, 1985
  • Jayna, 1963
  • Jazmin, 2009
  • Jensine, 1992
  • Jera, 1956
  • Jerre, 1942
  • Jescey, 1988
  • Jesi-Rai, 1988
  • Jeska, 2010
  • Jessi-Rae, 1991
  • Jillena, 1997
  • Jillissa, 1996
  • Jina, 2000
  • Jo’Lin, 1962
  • Jordyn, 1997
  • Jordynne, 1990
  • Josalyn, 1998
  • Joshuah, 1987
  • Joshwa, 1994
  • Josiah, 1992
  • Josiha, 1984
  • Jowellyn, 1963
  • Joye, 1948
  • Jozey, 2005
  • Justina, 1989
  • Justinian, 483

Jammey: The whitish name with the most cutesy male/female variations.  I’ve included just one other here, Jaime.  Until now I’ve delayed mentioning the problem of determining pronunciation phonetically.  I knew a man born in the 1960s or so who was also Jammey, pronounced with a long ‘a’.  But, phonetically, the first syllable should sound like a short ‘a’ as in blackberry jam.  It appears that young parents are attempting to use phonetics in reverse; sometimes, it seems, maliciously.  How else do you explain Alicen or Joshwa or Kloie?  (Well, I have my suspicions how else.)  So, phonetically, how do you pronounce Jammey?  Jerre?  Josiha?  Jazmin: Many annoying variations, but so far I haven’t seen Jazman for Jasmine.  Now for Jensine: Don’t ask me why, but I like that one.  Josalyn: for Jocelyn?  Justinian: Just playing with you here.  The first one I know of really was born anno domini 483.

– K –

  • Kaedryn, 2016
  • Kaeley, 1963
  • Kaelie, 1987
  • Kaelin, 1998
  • Kaelyn, 2009
  • Kaelynn, 2009
  • Kaiden, 2004
  • Kaidence, 2006
  • Kaila, 1990
  • Kailee, 2000
  • Kailey, 2002
  • Kainen, 2004
  • Kaitee, 1988
  • Kaitlyne, 1997
  • Kalara, 1969
  • Kalista, 2000
  • Kalli, 2006
  • Kalob, 1991
  • Kambi, 1973
  • Kameren, 2004
  • Kameryn, 2004
  • Kamryn, 1991
  • Karagan, 2000
  • Karysa, 1995
  • Kassidi, 2007
  • Kaya, 2002
  • Kaybren, 2010
  • Kaycee, 200
  • Kayde, 2010
  • Kaydence, 2010
  • Kaylan, 2006
  • Kaysi, 1993
  • Kaysie, 1992
  • Kelce, 2001
  • Kelci, 2001
  • Kelcie, 1995
  • Kellan, 2007
  • Kelo, 1959
  • Kelsi, 1996
  • Kelvin, 1990
  • Kiana, 1999
  • Kiara, 1999
  • Kiaralyn, 2009
  • Kiaran, 2002
  • Kierra, 2007
  • Kilburn, 1948
  • Kina, 1987
  • Kinlee, 2010
  • Kinza, 2006
  • Kiran, 2003
  • Kirtley, 1945
  • Kitana, 2000
  • Kizandra, 1995
  • Kloee, 2005
  • Kloie, 2008
  • Kolton, 1997
  • Kora, 1934
  • Koree, 1978
  • Korin, 1963
  • Kortni, 1990
  • Kortnie, 1998
  • Kraig, 1982
  • Kriston, 1973
  • Kyan, 2004
  • Kyden, 2006
  • Kyla, 2000
  • Kyler, 1996
  • Kyma, 1932
  • Kyra, 1988
  • Kyrah, 2006
  • Kyran, 1997

Kaitee: second-most-abused name over the years, after Jamie.  Kalara: Alternate spelling of cholera?  Kambi: twin of Babmi?  Kameren, Kameryn, Kamryn: for Cameron?  Kaycee: How about Jaycee too?  Kaysi: Cutesi; (“Kaysi at the Bat”)  Kelvin: Warm in here?  Kelsi: See Kaysi.  Kizandra: Cassandra?  Kloee, Kloie: Chlöe?

– L –

  • Laila, 1956
  • Laken, 2007
  • Landyn, 2006
  • Laray, 1973
  • Lauris, 1907
  • Lavane, 1953
  • Lavona, 1971
  • Laycee, 1988
  • Leela, 1999
  • Leiana, 1989
  • Leigha, 1997
  • Leilani, 2001
  • Leine, 2002
  • Leonce, 1922
  • Lerie, 1953
  • Letty, 1925
  • Lexi, 1992
  • Lexie, 1951
  • Liisa, 1956
  • Linai, 1991
  • Lorelei, 1941
  • Lorine, 1932
  • Lorris, 1936
  • Loys, 1919
  • Ludivine, 1979
  • Lura, 1916
  • Lurana, 1922
  • Lycia, 1962
  • Lynzi, 2000

Lynzi: It’s hard to say just what is on the cutting edge of cutezi.  For a while (in the 1950s and earlier) there was a rush on the name Mitzi, due to the popularity of a singing, dancing actress, Mitzi Gaynor.

– M –

  • Maber, 1936
  • Macy, 2002
  • Maddux, 2007
  • Madelion, 1995
  • Madisyn, 1997
  • Madolin, 1952
  • Mahgin, 2005
  • Maidie, 1912
  • Maire, 1991
  • Maisey, 2003
  • Maitland, 1951
  • Maizie, 1996
  • Makenna, 1999
  • Makiah, 2001
  • Malik, 2000
  • Manique, 1988
  • Manley, 1927
  • Marchel, 1997
  • Marle, 1942
  • Marleighna,1990 (for
  • Marlena?)
  • Marrinna, 1998
  • Marsades, 1995
  • Maryola, 1997
  • Maskell, 1960
  • Mazie, 1997
  • McKenziey Luv, 2004
  • Medella, 1944
  • Meghana, 1985
  • Meghann, 1979
  • Megi, 1992
  • Meka, 2005
  • Melba, 1919
  • Melea, 1998
  • Meldon, 1942
  • Meldora, 1927
  • Mellissia, 1979
  • Melvena, 1914
  • Melynda, 1986
  • Merelyn, 1933
  • Merin, 2009
  • Mersia, 1998
  • Mettie, 1938
  • Meysha, 2003
  • Micheline, 1941
  • Mikell, 1988
  • Mikyla, 2002
  • Milin, 1991
  • Milleo, 1923
  • Minjie, 1992
  • Morgynn, 1999
  • Moriah, 1991
  • Myka, 2000

Madelion?  When I was a Cub Scout, I made Lion.  First I made Wolf and Bear, and I still have the uniform patches to show for it.  I don’t remember whether I made Webelos.  Madisyn: Maybe with some research I could get to the origin of Madison the surname.  Most names ending in ‘son’ simply indicate that the bearer of the name, originally, was the son of whomever.  Williamson, Johnson, Harrelson, Stevenson.  Maybe Madison has the same sort of origin.  So, what is ‘-syn’?  Would you name your kid Johnsyn or Stevensyn?  I suppose you would.  Maybe you’d change Tyson or Mason or Carson or Sampson to Tysyn or Masyn or Carsyn or Sampsyn.  (Maybe you’d change Mason to Maysin.  Why not?  Permission-by-name.)  It strikes me funny that a name such as Allison or Madison or son-of-anyone would be applied to a girl, but perhaps the parents recognize the gender-neutral aspect of ‘-son’, the way we used to recognize the gender-neutral application of ‘-man’ in ‘chairman’ and ‘mankind’.  Marsades: That’s neat.  Is it a spin on Mercedes or a new name that just coincidentally sounds similar?  Or maybe it doesn’t even sound similar but is condensed from the Marquis de Sade, (who drives a Marsades Bends).  Melea: biblical.  Minjie: This is a real Maine name.  First, Mingie is a valid surname.  But consider midges, those pesky little non-biting flies in the order Diptera, smaller than black flies and a nuisance chiefly due to their cloud-like abundance at certain times.  They can create quite a mess around windows and in your hair and in your mouth, (if you happen to draw a breath while you’re in a cloud of them).  In Maine, midges are commonly called mingies, with an ‘n’.  According to one source, mingies are also female prostitutes in the Dominican Republic.  And if that’s not enough, minges, without the second ‘i’, is also a term for a woman’s pubic hair or a vulgar term referring to women in general.  So it’s a name fraught with local color and other colloquial implications.  I also recall a female co-worker from many years ago who called herself Midge.  Myka: meaning Micah?

– N –

  • Nakissa, 2003
  • Nakomis, 1977
  • Nami, 1972
  • Narda, 1946
  • Nastassja, 2005
  • Natealia, 2000
  • Nedra, 1935
  • Nekia, 1984
  • Neoma, 1985
  • Neva, 1931
  • Nevaeh, 2004
  • Neveah, 2008
  • Nicque, 1925
  • Nishelle, 2006
  • Noellyne, 1940
  • Nova, 1990
  • Nycholle, 1991
  • Nyiah, 1982
  • Nyoka, 1962

Nami: Eh??  Neva: A river in Russia, pronounced more like Nyeva, but avoid calling your child Nevus.  Nycholle: Is this a kyootsye spelling of Nichole?  Yes, I looked it up and see that one book on this subject acknowledges 50 spellings and variations of the name.  Nevertheless, it is derived from Nicholas, which has undergone its own transitions over the years.  I just wonder what it’s like to be a kindergarten teacher these days…

– O –

  • Oke, 1946
  • Omerine, 1930
  • Oonah, 1932
  • Orace, 1922
  • Oriana, 2004
  • Oric, 1918
  • Orissie, 1927
  • Orrise, 1928
  • Osburn, 1933

Oke: Long ‘E’ – I happen to know this one and I think it has some Scandanavian origin.

– P –

  • Parrie, 1959
  • Pebbles, 1971
  • Peityn, 2011
  • Pennelia, 1943
  • Persis, 1941
  • Peta, 1982
  • Petya, 1985
  • Phalia, 1962
  • Phylicity, 1994
  • Pierrette, 1942
  • Plooma, 1928
  • Praise, 2001
  • Pureza, 1941

Pebbles: Where do you suppose that comes from?  Peityn: Getting cute with Peyton?  Peta: I met her once, and she rises to the name.  Maybe it should be all in caps because that suggests that acronyms might serve as given names as well, especially when they recall something that evokes a lot of emotion.  Later I make the suggestion of Nasa (from NASA).  That doesn’t generate much emotion, but if your other kids are Quasar, Pleiades, and Arcturus, then Nasa is a nice fit for the babie.

– Q –

  • Qeanna, 1991
  • Queenie, 1920
  • Quie, 1956

See my suggestions in Part 2 if you are looking for more name ideas beginning with ‘Q’.  This letter, as well as a few others, are woefully under-represented among current names and I have tried to rectify that.  Even though there is a live example here — we hope Qeanna is still alive — I don’t recommend using ‘Q’ without the ‘u’ because people will forever be trying to insert one.

– R –

  • Rabecka, 2002
  • Rae Jean, 1975
  • Raegene, 1986
  • Raiden, 1954
  • Rakel, 1989
  • Ralf, 1966
  • Ralphline, 1925
  • Ransford, 1962
  • Ravyn, 2002
  • Rayden, 2009
  • Rayna, 1966
  • Rayne, 1958
  • Rayvon, 1998
  • Regginal, 1942
  • Rella, 1928
  • Remee, 2000
  • Renabel, 1928
  • Reno, 1924
  • Reyanna, 1999
  • Rhiannon, 1977
  • Rhonni, 1991
  • Rhylee, 2006
  • Riann, 1987
  • Rianne, 1992
  • Riannon, 1985
  • Richardie, 1971
  • Ridge, 2004
  • Riene, 1922
  • Rikala, 2001
  • Rion, 2002
  • Rodel, 1992
  • Roene, 1946
  • Roman, 1973
  • Rona, 1936
  • Rosaire, 1951
  • Rosezanna, 1982
  • Rowena, 1919
  • Rowene, 1933
  • Rue, 1934
  • Ryker, 2003
  • Rylee, 2004
  • Ryleigh, 2002
  • Ryley, 1999

Ralphline: This is a woman.  She was known far and wide as Dolly.  No wonder.  Ravyn: At first it probably seemed bold to name a girl Raven.  But now let us play with it.  Rayvon, Ravyn.  Maybe we can go forward to Rave-in.  Moving on, consider Remee: This happens to be a girl.  Now and then I look at a name on this list and imagine a grown man going about town with it.  That’s not to say that I believe a name should connote things about its bearer, unless the person wearing the name has labeled himself.  A guy going by Crash Octane must intend that his name create a particular impression.  But, no matter what I think, there will always be a faction of society, a feature of our culture, that will judge a person by a name. It has to do with language.  A name that too closely resembles a common word, or worse, evokes a vulgar image, will unavoidably be associated with that word.  Could you take an adult seriously whose first name is Yurin or Knipel? vYou would first need to suppress your involuntary facial response to the name, then retreat into forced politeness.  If I meet a person named Orka, my mind will say “whale”.  What strikes the majority of 20-year-olds funny and what amuses me are, of course, different things.  Ten years from now, today’s 20-year-olds won’t know the newest slang, but Kinlee and Caylub, their 10- and 12-year-old children at that time, will have a whole new street language, and names that seem innocent now will be funny to them.  (Maybe this is an argument, weak though it is, for re-using a tried-and-true set of names that are sort of exempt from abuse and scorn.)

– S –

  • Sabashtin, 2010
  • Salmon, 2007
  • Seairha, 1990 (dryh)
  • Sensimillia, 1998
  • Serephima, 1997
  • Sessa, 2002
  • Shaelyn, 1996
  • Shalee, 1983
  • Shandi, 1975
  • Shandie, 1968
  • Shandra, 1974
  • Shanonn, 1979
  • Sharra, 1975
  • Sharrae, 2003
  • Shar-Ron, 1955
  • Shaughn, 1972
  • Shaunta, 1990
  • Shayna, 1997
  • Shealy, 2000
  • Shelia, 1957
  • Shelda, 1941
  • Shenequa, 1984
  • Shera, 1989
  • Sheray, 1985
  • Shianna,1977 (Rhianna)
  • Siarra, 1999
  • Sidsel, 1954
  • Sierrah, 1995
  • Sirah, 2001
  • Solange, 1945
  • Song, 1950
  • Soraya, 1966
  • Sorrel, 1961
  • Spirit, 2009
  • Spurgeon, 1946
  • Starla, 1974
  • Storm, 2001
  • Stormy, 1994
  • Suanne, 1967
  • Summer Wisdom, 2000
  • Sylda, 1915
  • Sylvain, 1922
  • Symone, 1999

Sabashtin: Makes you want to hold your breath for a second or two, doesn’t it?  Does the original name no longer have any meaning whatsoever?  Salmon: Salmo salar in Maine, a noble fish, also recalls Salmon P. Chase, who preceded my cousin Levi Woodbury as US Treasury Secretary.  Siarra, Sierrah: similar to sierra, Spanish for ‘saw’.  Sirah: a variety of grapes, a character on Star Trek, the word “head” in Java, a songstress with an interesting history.

– T –

  • Tahsha, 1980
  • Taiyler, 1994
  • Tamiko, 1995
  • Tamilia, 1971
  • Tamsin, 1975
  • Tamula, 1968
  • Tarzan, 1942
  • Tawni, 1993
  • Taylore, 1998
  • Tayna, 2004
  • Taz, 2005
  • Teagan, 2004
  • Tegan, 2008
  • Tené, 2008
  • Terrianah, 2005
  • Tetia, 1960
  • Thala, 1953
  • Thane, 1955
  • Therlie, 1984
  • Thorin, 2003
  • Thylie, 2007
  • Tierairis, 2002
  • Tomie, 1973
  • Travice, 1980
  • Treyce, 2005
  • True, 2008
  • Tylor, 2003
  • Tyneisha, 2005
  • Tyreasa, 2008
  • Tyrese, 2002

Taz: Hmmm, besides the Warner Brothers character affectionately known as Taz, is there another source for this name, or is it just a chance use of a simple syllable?  True: An old name resurrected; two of my distant male ancestors, born in 1756 and 1782, carried this as their given name.  Tyreasa: meaning Theresa?

– U –

  • Uda, 1931
  • Una, 1952

– V –

  • Valdore, 1933
  • Valicia, 1972
  • Velia, 1996
  • Vella, 1955
  • Verda, 1931
  • Verle, 1928
  • Vernard, 1937
  • Vernice, 1934
  • Vernley, 1956
  • Vetal, 1921
  • Villa, 1907
  • Vincetta, 1955

– W –

  • Waneta, 1935
  • Wanita, 1936
  • Warnita, 1923
  • Way, 1918
  • Welhelna, 1926
  • Willmont, 1929
  • Willow, 1974
  • Wilmot, 1922
  • Wuanita, 1962
  • Wulf, 2009

Waneta, Wanita, Wuanita: The Spanish is Juan for a man, Juanita for a woman.  The ‘J’ is pronounced much like our ‘H’ and the ‘U’ is what gives the name the ‘W’ sound.  These variants beginning with ‘W’ are examples of earlier manipulations of the spelling to adapt to the perceived pronunciation, ignoring the source of the name.  If you can’t appreciate the linguistics behind a foreign name, can you just avoid anglicizing it?

– X –

  • Xander, 2005
  • Xandir, 2010

We may assume that the leading ‘X’ is pronounced like ‘Z’.

– Y –

  • Yael, 2005

– Z –

  • Zander, 2007
  • Zara, 1929
  • Zashalynn, 2004
  • Zeda, 1997
  • Zenon, 1929
  • Zola, 1934

Hey, if whitish people without strong traditional influences commandeer names from other traditions, who’s to prevent it?  I already mentioned it in another sense but it is worth repeating: Italians, Hispanics who aren’t from Hispania, Jews, Japanese, Muslims, Chinese, Indians, Mormons, and even Irish and to some extent Polish all have ethnic cohesiveness in USA.  Germans, French, Scandinavians, Russians, Greek, and Iowans not so much.

(Those Greeks!  It isn’t in the lists, but I ran across the name Spyridon Akrivakos while putting this together.  Isn’t that a great name!)

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One thought on “Babie Nayms – Part 1

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